Girl Scouts Grow Food for Franklin Community Center Pantry

Screen Shot 2018-07-12 at 10.55.38 AM.pngBrownie troop 3031 has a plot in the Pitney Meadows Community Gardens and recently donated green beans to the Franklin Community Center’s food pantry.

Troop leader Jen Kirchhnerr has found that recycled plastic containers are a great way to deliver the beans and other vegetables to the pantry.

These are the sort of container that strawberries, blueberries and the like are typically sold in at the supermarket.

Kirchhnerr cleans and washes the containers and reuses them when harvesting for the food pantry.

“They are a convenient size for handing out to a family,” she said.

It’s a good tip. If any gardeners have containers like these and would like to share them, you can leave the cleaned containers in the garden shed. We will use them when harvesting and sharing.

Thanks Jen for your tip!Screen Shot 2018-07-12 at 10.55.19 AM

PMCG Bountiful Harvest!

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Snap peas harvested yesterday. So tasty right off the vine!

Nice work community gardeners Kay and Grace seen here harvesting from their plot.

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Kay S., a master gardener, will be conducting a class on harvesting July 12th at 6:30 p.m. in the Pitney Meadows Community Gardens.

The lecture covers how to know when to harvest, when is the best time of day to pick vegetables for maximum flavor, and so much more.

Hope too see you there.

Great Sunflower Wreath Making Class with Suzanne Balet-Haight

Screen Shot 2017-10-14 at 1.56.40 PM Suzanne Balet-Haight taught a wreath making class in her greenhouse on Nelson Avenue Extension this morning using the sunflowers grown in the Pitney Meadows Community Gardens.

It was great fun and each person’s wreath came out very different.  There were Adirondack style wreaths, country cottage wreaths, and even a very elegant wreath.

What did they all had in common? Sunflowers and lots of them.

Suzanne, an excellent teacher, showed everyone the proper way to attach the sunflowers using 22 gauge wire. She demonstrated making bows with grasses and how to secure different flowers she had on hand to the grapevine wreaths. Participants used marigolds, amaranths, Dallas blue grass, cedar, statice, sedums and more.

Lots of Fun and Beautiful, Too

She began by demonstrating how to make floral sprays to attach to the wreath.  Everyone in the class heard the same instructions, but the results were an individual as the participants.  A truly creative experience.Screen Shot 2017-10-14 at 1.55.30 PM

Suzanne teaches floral decorating and wreath making throughout our area. She has taught classes on creating Christmas and hydrangea wreaths, and boxwood tree centerpieces.  If you’d like to try your hand at one, contact her through her website,  Balet Flowers and Greenhouse. She is a talented artist and knowledgeable teacher.

Also, a generous one.  The proceeds of the class today were donated to the Pitney Meadows Community Gardens to put towards the Spring fairy gardens the girl scouts are creating. Thank you, Suzanne for sharing your time and talents.

 

30 lbs of Fresh Produce Brought to Food Pantry From Pitney Meadows

Screen Shot 2017-09-23 at 4.36.24 PM.pngI’m delighted to report that yesterday 30 pounds of tomatoes, squash, herbs, greens and carrots were donated  to the Franklin Community Center’s food pantry. It was a combination of vegetables harvested from the farm garden and the community gardens.

Thank you to all who contributed.

If any Pitney Meadows Community Gardens gardener wants to contribute, I will be in the garden Wednesday morning and can collect vegetables then.

 

What’s the Best Part of Gardening?

 

Harvesting!

The sunflowers are being harvested and sold for feeding birds, or making flower arrangements. The money raised will be put back into the community gardens.

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There are several ways to hang the sunflower for the birds. The easiest is to tie a string around the stem and hang it from a bird feeder or a branch.

Within an hour,  the chickadees found it and gave us a great show.

 

 

 

The tomatoes are ripening fast. Look at all the different colorful heirloom varieties that were grown.

The cauliflower head is about the size of the gardener’s head and looks terrific.

And the corn was reported to be very tasty by the couple who grew the Iroquois “three sisters” garden of corn, beans and squash.

The garden is doing great. Come see.  As you walk around, notice how the pumpkins are beginning to orange.

If you are interested in learning more about how you can garden at the Pitney Meadows Community Gardens next season,  drop me a note and I will add your name to the list of gardeners who will be contacted in 2018 when the applications for next year become available.

In the meantime,  I hope to meet you in the garden.