Knockouts in Bloom

 

closeupDo you recall that three weeks ago (June 22nd) I deadheaded my Knockout Roses?

I said then that I would let you know when they flowered. Well, they are in bloom and looking very pretty. In fact, they never looked poorly.

After the trimming, the new growth was an attractive reddish color. Then came the buds and now the flowers

Very nice.

For those who need numbers, it was 21 days from deadheading to the first bloom. And now there are many flowers. And, many more to come.

 

KnockoutJuly

Deadheading Knockout Roses

deadheadingrosesYes, I know you don’t HAVE to deadhead Knockout roses. “Their self-cleaning,” marketers say.

I know. I’ve heard that, too. And while it’s correct, it is only part of the story.

Knockouts will do fine with no deadheading. However, when you remove the roses that are past their prime, it signals the plant to begin the next bloom cycle. And that’s what I want, plenty of blooms. I don’t want seed heads.


Pleasant Morning

I was out in the garden early with a scissor and a basket. I chatted with neighbors walking their dogs, jogging and biking. The time went by quickly as I snipped off – on an angle – dozens of faded red rose blooms. When I was done with one side and moving to the next, I noticed how pretty even the faded blooms looked in the basket. Thus this photo…deadheadingknockouts

I’ll let you know when the next cycle of bloom begins.

Front Yard Complete (Almost) and Beautiful

The photos say it all.

frontofmadison
Before, the area in front of the Limelight hydrangeas needed mowing. I’m not fond of mowing especially in tight spaces.

Now, Double Red Knockout roses have replaced the lawn. No more mowing, continuous blooms of red, a light spicy fragrance and a neat and tidy look.
front2

That’s low maintenance at its best.

What I did was dig three holes and mix cow manure and peat moss into the soil that was removed from the hole. Run water into the hole to soak. Place the roses and return the amended soil mix around the plant and pat it in.

Then I placed a soaker hose to reach the crown of the roses and hydrangeas. Water the plants well. front1

The next step was to cover the grassy soil area with cardboard and then heavy duty landscape fabric. Why cardboard? To smother the grass and weeds and hold moisture in. I have done this before and know it will remain weed free for a decade.

20130831_4335Then I covered the landscape fabric with cedar mulch, which also lasts a long time.

I’m almost done. As the earth and mulch settle over the next couple of weeks, I will tweak the front bricks to be even and cover any bare spots that come through.

Then on to the next project….there’s always a next project, right?