Girl Scouts Rock the Herb Garden

Earlier this season, the girl scouts made colorful rock markers for our community herb garden, which is located near the garden shed. Each rock bears the name of a different herb.

This weekend, with the help of friends and siblings, the girl scouts placed the markers in the raised beds, planted herb seeds and watered them in.

Thank you all. The markers look festive and happy in the raised beds. A job well done.

All PMCG gardeners are welcome to come and cut a few herbs from these two beds as soon as they grow a little. We have parsley, sage, dill, thyme, lemon verbena, rosemary, cilantro, borage, chives, basil, savory, Greek oregano, marjoram and more growing for all to enjoy. Take a look next time you are in the garden.

 

 

Playing with Food: Radish Mice

 

When around 4-years-old, my child heard the Marvin Gaye song “Everybody Plays the Fool” only my sweet young one sang:

“Everybody plays with food sometimes
There’s no exception to the rule, listen baby
It may be factual, it may be cruel, I ain’t lying
Everybody plays with food.”

It brought a smile to my face then and still does. The catchy version has become a family classic we continue to sing every once in while to this day.

Radish Mice

You may want to try singing it today if you decide to make a little radish mouse. These look great on a cheese plate or around a crudite platter. And, they are easy to make.

Start with a radish that has the root attached. The root is the mouse’s tail.

Trim the mouse’s under belly with a paring knife so it is steady and reserve the cut off slice. This can often be used as ears.  With the mouse I made, the piece was too large to be ears so I cut into another radish for two ear slices.

With the paring knife, make two deep slits into the mouse head where the ears will go. Slide the ears in. They should stay in place.

Use cloves or peppercorns for the eyes. It is easiest to use a toothpick to make a hole before trying to push the eyes in place.

That’s it. You did it. Like the song almost says,

Everybody plays with food sometimes.

After the Rain

The gardens after the today’s rain are a satisfying place to be.

They are filled to the brim with beauty.

Every plant has bathe in the moisture and are the better for it. We gardeners water but rain has a special magic.

The tiny sunflowers on the west side have poked their little plump leaves up through the soil. They germinated in only six days and now the rows of half-inch tall plants hold the promise of cheerful, yellow blooms on tall stalks later in the season.

Walking about, the zucchinis are flourishing and the Swiss chard, kale and lettuce are ready to be harvested. Basil looks like it enjoyed the rain and the frilly tops of tiny carrot seedlings carpet certain beds.

Many plants are showing their fruits and colorful combinations.  More promises of good things to come.

Tomorrow, I will be working in the garden.

I hope to see you there, Natalie

 

What Does Our Scarecrow Need?

Screen Shot 2017-07-22 at 4.34.03 PM.pngWhat would make this scarecrow better?

A hat? hair? gloves? boots? a belt?

Right now, he looks like he needs a little something.

Your suggestions are welcome.  We will work on him again next Saturday – July 29th – at 9 a.m. And then, set him in the new sunflower area.

And, I will have the frame for another child-size scarecrow ready to dress and stuff. If you want to add something – clothing, a hat, a necklace – to this scarecrow, bring it along.

We look forward to seeing you in the garden.

 

Judy Brunner’s Mini Farm

Screen Shot 2017-07-20 at 12.53.36 PM.pngThe Saratogian has an article on Judy Brunner’s mini-farm.

Judy, an artist and retired Saratoga Springs teacher, grew up on a farm and knew just the right touches to add to her mini-farm.

You can link to the article here:  Saratogian Mini-farm

On Saturday, the farm will be set up and ready for adults to see and for children to come and play.

 

Is It Too Late to Plant from Seed?

 

greenbeanNot at all.

What can you plant now and in August?

The answer is quite a bit. Here goes:

Beans

Bush beans are easiest as they don’t require staking. Try planting seeds of a different variety each week and do a taste test to determine what you like best. Stop sowing beans seeds in early August.

carrotsCarrots

If you plant now, you will harvest a fall crop.

Cucumbers
Again, I would select a bush cucumber plant because space tends to be at a premium in a raised bed. If you have the room, go for a vining cucumber. Chefs tell me they are tastier.
lettuce

Lettuce

In mid- August sow lettuce seeds for a fall crop. I have plenty of lettuce seeds available in the community garden shed. Look for the days to harvest to determine what lettuce seeds are best to grow.

Kale 

From mid-July through mid-August plant seeds of kale for harvest in the fall.

Spinach

Spinach likes it cool. Start from seed in mid to late August.

 

Peas

The harvest will be modest for August planting green peas and sugar peas. But, if you have the room, go for it. Did you know Thomas Jefferson use to compete with his farm neighbors to see who could harvest the earliest peas? The winner hosted a dinner serving (what else?) some peas.

Radish

This is a quick growing vegetable. They are ready to be harvested in a month.

Anyone have some good radish recipes?