We Made A Scarecrow Today

You know the expression, it takes a village to raise a child. Well, it took a village to make this scarecrow.

Bob LeClair made the frame. The clothes came from the thrift shop. The houseplants we planted in the shoes came from my son,  Gina found the straw hat at a garage sale. The scarecrows’s stuffing was wood wool – packing material donated by Rocky Dale Nursery in Bristol, Vt.  and the buttons, felt and muslin came from the generous ladies in the craft room at the community center.  Thank you all.

The kids…about 60…  who are part of the Family Gardening Program participated in his construction.  It was a hot day but groups of kids worked hard to make him come alive. And, he looks darn good.

Here are some photos so you can see for yourself.

Here is the finished scarecrow.  That fine friendly face was made by Miss Nancy and her helpers.

Here is the finished scarecrow. That fine friendly face was made by Miss Nancy and her helpers.

We stuffed him with wood wool. It is easy to work with.

We stuffed him with wood wool. It is easy to work with.

We couldn't find boots so we laid his shoes with soil and planted two spider plants in them.

We couldn’t find boots so painted shoes purple,  filled his shoes with soil and planted two spider plants in them.

In the end he looked pretty darn happy.

In the end, he looked pretty darn happy and so did we.

First Day of Family Gardening Program 2014

Hi everyone –

Today is the first day of the Family Gardening Program at the Moreau Community Garden. There will be children in the garden this morning making a scarecrow and being introduced to what is being grown.

All community gardeners are welcome to join me at noon to ask questions about their plants or just to hang out at the picnic tables for a while and talk.

I hope to see you there.

Natalie, Master Gardener

Scarecrow Construction and Costume Ideas

I’ve started working on lesson plans for the Family Gardening Program at Moreau Community Garden. Not only do we walk through the gardens weeding, watering and looking for anything out of the ordinary, we also take steps to keep our garden entertaining, safe and looking good.

And I can’t think of a better source of fun than a scarecrow.

Scarecrows have been used for centuries to keep crows from the crops. Our garden might not need to scare off crows, but a scarecrow will be a friendly addition sure to bring a smile.

Since I’m new to scarecrow construction I went to the internet, did some research and found a suitable sturdy form. It has two legs for support and then the typical cross shape for the torso, arms and head. Once the stakes are in the ground, our scarecrow should stand strong. Here’s my drawing, which is open to suggestions and revisions. Scarecrow

I have collected a shirt, jeans and was offered burlap for the head. I have buttons for eyes. And someone offered me a fake mustache. We still need gumboots, gloves, a hat, a belt and maybe a bandana. What do you think?

If possible, I’d like our scarecrow to have a change of clothes….for example, a team shirt, a Hawaiian print shirt, a jacket for special occasions, a cowboy outfit. Something that will make people laugh when they see our “dapper” scarecrow. Ideas are welcome.

Research on scarecrow “inners” determined that straw was the material of choice and stuffing plastic grocery bags with the straw made stuffing the scarecrow easy for children to handle. It also keeps the center dry.

We will first fill bags with straw, tie them closed, then stuff the shirt, pants, etc. I will need to collect plastic bags and if any gardeners have some to spare, please bring them to the garden and leave them in the shed. Also, if anyone wants to donate a bale of straw, we would appreciate that.

This should be fun.

Once he is made, we should have a contest to come up with a name! Send in your thoughts and we can take a vote. The person whose name gets the most votes, names the scarecrow.

Thank you all.

Natalie